Thursday, June 16, 2022

 https://smarthistory.org/delacroix-liberty-leading-the-people/


Thursday, April 14, 2022

Visual Response to Parable of The Sower

 Assignment: 

Create a personal visual response to Parable of The Sower. Reflect on the visual analysis exercises and in class discussions for Parable and The Sower to create a collection of images that visually communicate your perception of Octavia Butler's story. 


Step I, Collect Images:
  • Collect images that visually communicate your perception of Parable of The Sower. 
  • Do:
    • Select images that reflect your understanding of the narrative. 
    • Select images that reflect the emotions you experienced when reading the narrative. 
    • Select images that reflect how you imagine the narrative before or after the author's story. 
    • Select images that connect your personal experience with the narrative. 
  • Do not:
    • Do not select images from the illustrators that depict images in the graphic novel. 
    • Do not select images of book covers. 
    • Do not include images of the author. 
    • Do not include images with text. 
  • Use images from the internet and/or images you take yourself. 
  • Include at least eight (8) images. No more than twelve (12). 


Step II, Begin to Arrange Images:
  • Place all images on one page. 
  • Maintain a thin border around each image (refer to examples below). 
  • Note: the examples below are not examples of this assignment. 
  • Carefully consider how the formal qualities of the images such as line, color, texture, shape, composition, scale visually communicate your perceptions.
  • Perhaps you want one image to be a focal point. How will this be achieved? Place in center? Or have a grid with one image in color and the others in black and white. Or maybe you will have one image with different content from the rest. 
  • You can also utilize a theme. Perhaps all images are portraits of people. Or maybe all images contain the same dominant color. 


Step III, Title:
  • Assign a title to your visual response. Place title underneath image collection. 


Step IV, Image Source Links:
  • In a separate document, list links to all images. 
  • Include your name in the document .
  • Try to list links in order of images, but not necessary. 


Step V:
  • Present your visual response to the class. 
  • Date announced in class. 


Step VI, Email:
  • Email the two files to Prof. Vigliotti and Prof. Mongiovi. 
  • Please send email within 24 hours of presenting to class. 
  • Please send all files as word documents. 
  • Label file for image collection:
    • LastName_VR_Images
  • Label file for sources:
    • LastName_VR_Sources


Online Tools:
Canva.com has templates that some of you may find helpful. 
You can also use templates in Word or make your own arrangement. 


A few examples:

Image Source:




Image Source:




More:

 

Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Dorothea Lange, Photojournalist, American, b. 1895 d. 1965


Migrant Mother
1936
Location - California


  • Working as a photographer for Depression-era government to raise awareness of struggling farmers.
  • Pea-pickers camp in California. 
  • Seven children. 
  • Frozen vegetables and birds killed by children. 
  • Photo published in the paper (San Francisco News) 
  • Tagline - "What does the New Deal Mean To This Mother and Her Children"
  • Farmers driven west due to Great Depression and Dust Bowl.
  • Great Depression, 1930's, economic decline. 
  • Dust Bowl, 1930's, Plains region, Agriculture. 
  • New Deal, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1930's, Financial Reform - Public Work Project and Regulations. 





Made photographs to influence social change. 
Assigned to document World War II internment of Japanese Americans






Pledge of Allegiance, Raphael Weill Elementary School, San Francisco
1942
A few weeks prior to evacuation. 




Source Links:

Tuesday, February 1, 2022

Honors LC, Spring 2022, Digital Archive Blog Links

 Cheryl Bitecola

September Boyer

Alicia Cousino

Calloway Delaney

Emily DuSold

Tristan Fratello

Destiny Kusen

Akemi Martinez Gutarra

Natalie Masten

Skylar Newsham

Harleigh Peck

Annabel St. George

Madison Test

Maia Toler

Lili Walpert

In Conversation

 Honors Learning Community, Spring 2021

ENG 202 and ART/COM 218

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-_3_ZRYkGQ

Stories and Legends Project, Honors LC, Spring 2022


What is oral history? 

Oral history is the systematic collection and recording of individual memories as historical documentation. An oral historian collects memories in the same way a museum collects artifacts. Many museums of modern history collect oral histories along with artifacts, ensuring that that their physical collection of objects is more fully interpreted.


While passing down history orally is probably as old as humanity, the field of oral history is less than a century old. Source: https://www.utep.edu/liberalarts/oral-history/about/what-is-oral-history.html



       

Why are oral histories important? 

Oral history is a fundamental way to capture gaps in the written record, preserve the firsthand recollections of the individual in his or her own voice, and enrich the work of scholars and curators who organize exhibitions of visual work. 

Image source:


How long have people been collecting oral histories? 

The practice of collecting oral history has been around for a long time. The so-called father of history, Herodotus, used oral sources to compile his early Greek histories. Anthropologists recorded oral histories from Indigenous People on phonographs in the late 1800's. David P. Bode recorded the stories of Holocaust survivors in the 1940's. Shortly after these recordings, the modern concept of oral history was developed by Allan Nevins and his associates at Columbia University. In 2015 Svetlana Alexandrovna Alexievich, an essayist and oral historian, was awarded the Novel Peace Prize in Literature. 

Since the 1970s, with a growing interest in local and community history, historians began to rely more on direct oral sources to explore the lives of people often left out of historical works. These people include ethnic and racial minorities, working-class men and women, and even children. By going directly to these sources, historians have been able to explore and document their sources through first-hand accounts. 

Today oral history continues to be a popular and fruitful technique for historians to capture the “voice” of a person who actually experienced an event or time period. From these individual accounts, historians can often draw larger conclusions about historical eras, geographical areas, and specific events. Source https://www.nationalww2museum.org/oral-history-resources


For our class project, select an oral history from the Flagler College Civil Rights Library or the St. Augustine Historical Research Library. We are using oral histories of people significant to St. Augustine.  



FLAGLER COLLEGE CIVIL RIGHTS LIBRARY. See link below. 

https://civilrights.flagler.edu/

Update Feb. 10

Submit request for information to  Jolene DuBray, Flagler College Archivist. See link below:

https://flagler.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6hs6FFjJm2dYCln



ST. AUGUSTINE HISTORICAL RESEARCH LIBRARY. See link below. 

https://cdm16973.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/

Important Note: Some of you will need to return to the St. Augustine Historical Research Library to continue research. Go to the link below to get phone number. You must call and make an appointment. The link below also provides additional research links that can be used for continued research. 

https://staughs.com/research-library/

Update February 4:

Contact info for 
Nicole Diehm, 
Digital Collections Librarian 
at St. Augustine Historical Reseasrch Library
nicole@sahs1883.com
904-825-2333




HAS THE TOPIC OF ORAL HISTORY 

PIQUED YOUR INTEREST? 


See links below to check out projects across the country. Many more projects to be found by searching "oral histories" on the internet. 


STORY CORPS

https://storycorps.org/podcast/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA0eOPBhCGARIsAFIwTs5oK2WUea9J-9d9iEG9-bdCajdf1Llk805xmso_qZ8Im_GhH4NYp-0aAtyaEALw_wcB


BLACK WOMEN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT

https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/schlesinger-library/collections/black-women-oral-history-project


QUESTION BRIDGE

https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/question_bridge/


THE PHILADELPHIA PUBLIC HISTORY TRUCK

https://phillyhistorytruck.wordpress.com/


THE VOICES OF THE MANHATTAN PROJECT

https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/


MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/archives/oral-history


NATIONAL WOMEN'S HALL OF FAME

https://www.womenofthehall.org/women-of-the-hall/voices-great-women/




HIGHLY SUGGEST CHECKING OUT 

FINDING YOUR ROOTS

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. traces celebrity ancestry. 

Go to the link below to watch videos. 

https://www.pbs.org/weta/finding-your-roots/



WANT TO SEARCH YOUR OWN ANCESTRY? 


Check out Ancestry.com. Link below. 



CHECK OUT THE PODCAST MOTH RADIO HOUR 

FOR LIVE STORYTELLING EVENTS


Storytelling can be seen as a form of oral history. 
The historian/interviewer is not part of the conversation. A person composes their story for oral delivery to an audience. The stories in this podcast range from highly emotional to social commentary to humor.




AND LASTLY, IF YOU ARE A FAN OF THE TV SHOW 
THE OFFICE, CHECK OUT THIS 
ORAL HISTORY OF THE SHOW.